• TUC LGBT Discrimination in the Workplace

    The Trades Union Congress (TUC) commissioned this research from ICM to better understand LGBT people’s experience of sexual harassment at work. We not only asked about instances of sexual harassment but also whether people had felt able to report it and what impact the sexual harassment had on their physical and mental health.

    ICM interviewed a sample of 1,001 LGBT workers (who have worked within the last 5 years) aged 18+ living in Great Britain online between 22 November and 5 December 2018. No quotas were set as the exact profile of LGBT people in Great Britain is not available in census data. Data therefore remains unweighted.

    ICM also conducted an additional 150 interviews among female LGBT workers (who have worked within the last 5 years) aged 18+ living in Great Britain, in order to facilitate a more robust analysis. These interviews have been combined with those from LGBT women from the main sample, and can be seen in the ‘women only’ data tables.

    The TUC’s report can be read here. The report was covered widely, including by The Guardian and the BBC.

    The overall LGBT workers data can be viewed by clicking here

    The boosted data on LGBT women workers can be viewed by clicking here

     

     

  • British Future – Festival of Great Britain & Northern Ireland

    Independent think-tank British Future commissioned ICM Unlimited to carry out nationally representative research looking at the 14-18 NOW arts programme and attitudes to the arts and history more broadly. The findings of the research are drawn upon in British Future’s Crossing Divides: How arts and heritage can help bring us together‘ report, and in the accompanying press release on the British Future website.

    Sunder Katwala, British Future Director and co-author of the report, wrote a related article (‘Investment in the arts could help bridge Britain’s divides‘) in The Times.

    As part of this poll, respondents were asked about the proposed ‘Festival of Great Britain and Northern Ireland’. The results to this question were referenced in an article (Timing of May’s ‘festival of Britain’ risks Irish anger‘) in The Observer on Sunday 14 April, as well as in British Future’s own write-up.

    The results of this question can be downloaded below. The results of the rest of the poll can be found here.

    ICM interviewed a sample of 2,009 GB adults aged 18+ online using its omnibus service between the 15 and 18 February 2019. ICM also interviewed 251 GB 16-17-year-olds between 15 and 20 February 2019. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all GB adults (aged 16+). A boost sample of 507 ethnic minority respondents was also achieved between 15 and 18 February 2019.

  • British Future – Crossing Divides

    Independent think-tank British Future commissioned ICM Unlimited to carry out nationally representative research looking at the 14-18 NOW arts programme and attitudes to the arts and history more broadly. The findings of the research are drawn upon in British Future’s Crossing Divides: How arts and heritage can help bring us together‘ report, and in the accompanying press release on the British Future website.

    Sunder Katwala, British Future Director and co-author of the report, wrote a related article (‘Investment in the arts could help bridge Britain’s divides‘) in The Times.

    ICM interviewed a sample of 2,009 GB adults aged 18+ online using its omnibus service between the 15 and 18 February 2019. ICM also interviewed 251 GB 16-17-year-olds between 15 and 20 February 2019. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all GB adults (aged 16+). A boost sample of 507 ethnic minority respondents was also achieved between 15 and 18 February 2019.

  • BBC Wales – St. David’s Day Poll (4)

    ICM Unlimited were commissioned by BBC Wales to carry out the annual St. David’s Day Poll among the general public in Wales.

    This poll has been covered on the BBC News website here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-47538946

    Below is a summary of the key findings of the question on perceptions of racial prejudice in Wales and perceptions of the impact of migrants.

    Key findings

    • As many as two in five Welsh residents think that there is generally more racial prejudice in Wales now compared to five years ago (40%), while only under one in six think that there is less now (16%) and just under two in five think that the level of racial prejudice is about the same (37%). This means that people living in Wales are more than twice as likely to think that, compared to five years ago, there is now more racial prejudice in the country rather than less – with a similar magnitude of difference when looking to whether racial prejudice will increase or decrease in the next five years. In their assessment of the outlook over the next five years, under one in five thinking that the amount of racial prejudice in Wales will decrease (18%) with around three in ten thinking it will increase (31%)
    • Three in five adults in Wales agree that ‘migrants from other countries have a positive impact on Britain’s economy’ (60%), while a similar proportion agree that ‘Britain’s cultural life is generally enriched by migrants coming to live here from other countries’ (56%)

    ICM Unlimited interviewed a representative sample of 1,000 adults aged 18+ by telephone between 7-23 February 2019. Interviews were conducted across Wales and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults in Wales. ICM is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

  • BBC Wales – St. David’s Day Poll 2019 (3)

    ICM Unlimited were commissioned by BBC Wales to carry out the annual St. David’s Day Poll among the general public in Wales.

    This poll has been covered on the BBC News website here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-47475486

    Below is a summary of the key findings of the question on how adults in Wales see themselves with regards to nationality.

    Key findings

    • Just under half of those born in Wales say that they see themselves as either entirely Welsh or more Welsh than British. One in five say that they see themselves as ‘Welsh not British’ (21%), while just under three in ten describe themselves as ‘More Welsh than British’ (27%). Only one in twenty of those born in Wales say that they feel ‘More British than Welsh’ (5%) and 2% say that they feel ‘British not Welsh’ (2%)

    Further details of the, as well as some of the earlier findings can be found here: https://www.icmunlimited.com/polls/bbc-wales-st-davids-day-poll-2019-2/ and here: https://www.icmunlimited.com/polls/bbc-wales-st-davids-day-poll-2019/

    ICM Unlimited interviewed a representative sample of 1,000 adults aged 18+ by telephone between 7-23 February 2019. Interviews were conducted across Wales and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults in Wales. ICM is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

  • BBC Wales – St. David’s Day Poll 2019 (2)

    ICM Unlimited were commissioned by BBC Wales to carry out the annual St. David’s Day Poll among the general public in Wales.

    This poll has been covered on the BBC News website here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-47443374

    Below is a summary of the key findings of the questions on whether the monarchy should be abolished, whether there should be a new Prince of Wales when Charles becomes King, and the nature of a possible future investiture ceremony.

    Key findings

    • Three in five adults in Wales disagree that the monarchy should be abolished (62%), while one in five agree that it should be (18%)
    • Half of adults in Wales agree that there should be a new Prince of Wales when Prince Charles becomes King (50%), compared to less than a quarter who disagree (22%).
    • When it comes to the possibility of an investiture for a possible successor to Prince Charles as Prince of Wales, the most popular outcome is that there is ‘an investiture similar to that Prince Charles had at Caenarfon in 1969’ (41%), while one in five think that a different style of investiture should take place (20%) and three in ten think that there should be no investiture at all (30%).

    Further details of the poll, as well as some of the earlier findings, can be found here: https://www.icmunlimited.com/polls/bbc-wales-st-davids-day-poll-2019/

    ICM Unlimited interviewed a representative sample of 1,000 adults aged 18+ by telephone between 7-23 February 2019. Interviews were conducted across Wales and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults in Wales. ICM is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

  • BBC Wales – St. David’s Day Poll 2019

    ICM Unlimited were commissioned by BBC Wales to carry out the annual St. David’s Day poll among the general public in Wales.

    This poll has been covered on the BBC News website: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-47394303

    Below is a summary of some of the key findings of the Westminster and Welsh Assembly voting intentions questions and of the tracker questions on the future of devolution and the perceived impact of Brexit.

     

    Key Findings

    • The Westminster voting intentions show that, while Labour continues to be the largest party in terms of overall vote share, the proportion who say they would vote Labour at a General Election has fallen from 49% in February 2018 to 42% this year (-7 percentage points). We see small gains for the Conservatives (33%, up 1 from 2018), Plaid Cymru (13%, +2), the Liberal Democrats (6%, +1), and UKIP (3%, +1).
    • We see the same pattern with regard to voting intentions for the Welsh Assembly ballots. For the Constituency Ballot, Labour vote share declines from 40% last year to 34% this year (-6). While all other parties benefit at Labour’s expense, the largest improvement is seen for Plaid Cymru, rising from 24% in 2018 to 27% this year (+3). The Conservatives (23%), the Liberal Democrats (7%), and the Green Party (2%) all see modest gains from this time last year (all rise by 1 percentage point).
    • In the Regional Ballot Labour’s vote share falls from 36% to 32% (-4) compared to last year, with Plaid Cymru again seeing the largest uplift (25%, +3) among the other parties.
    • We see little change in opinions when it comes to the role of the Welsh Assembly. The most common response continues to be that the ‘Welsh Assembly should have more powers than it currently has’ (46%). If anything support for this option appears to be trending upwards, with 46% representing a two-percentage-point increase compared to February 2018 and being greater than at any time since September 2014. Support for independence remains at 7% (no change since 2018), while support for abolishing the Welsh Assembly hovers around 13% (+1).

     

    2010 2011 2012 2013 Mar-14 Sep-14 Mar-15 Mar-16 Mar-17 Feb-18 Feb-19
    Independence 11% 11% 7% 9% 5% 3% 6% 6% 6% 7% 7%
    Assembly plus more powers 40% 35% 36% 36% 37% 49% 40% 43% 44% 44% 46%
    Assembly remain as present 13% 18% 29% 28% 28% 26% 33% 30% 29% 28% 27%
    Assembly with fewer powers 18% 17% 2% 2% 3% 2% 4% 3% 3% 4% 3%
    Abolish Assembly 13% 15% 22% 20% 23% 12% 13% 13% 13% 12% 13%
    DK 4% 4% 4% 4% 5% 3% 4% 3% 4% 2%

     

    • We see a marked increase in pessimism on the impact of Brexit compared to February 2018. Well over half now think that Brexit will have a negative impact on the Welsh economy (56% vs. 49% in 2018). Similarly, the proportion who think that Brexit will have a negative impact on their own personal finances has grown from 36% in 2018 to 39% now. Finally, more than half now think that Brexit will have a negative effect on the way of life in Wales at the moment (51%, +5).
    To the Welsh Economy To your own personal finances On the way of life in Wales today in general
    Feb-18 Feb-19 Change Feb-18 Feb-19 Change Feb-18 Feb-19 Change
    Positive impact 24% 20% -4 14% 10% -4 23% 19% -4
    Negative impact 49% 56% +7 36% 39% +3 46% 51% +5
    Will make no difference 17% 16% -1 41% 42% +1 22% 23% +1
    DK 10% 8% -2 9% 9% 0 9% 7% -2

     

    ICM Unlimited interviewed a representative sample of 1,000 adults aged 18+ by telephone between 7-23 February 2019. Interviews were conducted across Wales and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults in Wales. ICM is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

    Click here for methodology details

  • Meaningful Vote Poll

    Following on from Theresa May’s heavy defeat in the House of Commons on Tuesday evening, ICM asked the British public which steps the Prime Minister should now take. We presented a range of possible options, including a second election, referendum, resignation, persisting with her deal, renegotiating a softer/harder deal, getting an extension to article 50 and pursuing a hard Brexit.

     

    While there is no majority in favour of any single option, Brits are most likely to think that May should pursue a ‘no deal’ Brexit (28%). Demonstrating the divide in public opinion, the next most popular option, supported by just under 1 in 4 (24%) of the public, is to start the process of holding a second referendum.

     

    It’s also illuminating to see what the general public don’t think should happen next – in the public’s eyes May’s deal is dead, with only 8% thinking she should persist on getting it through parliament. Only a small number more think she should call a general election (11%). And one of the most likely options in the eyes of many commentators – trying to renegotiate a ‘softer’ Brexit deal – only gets the support of 1 in 8 (13%) of the population.

     

    Given the no-confidence vote on Wednesday and the debate on what this means for Labour’s position on a second Referendum, it’s also worth noting that on this question 2017 Labour voters are much more likely to think May should hold a second referendum (34%) than call a snap general election (22%).

     

    And if a general election was called on the subject of Brexit, our poll would be concerning reading for the Labour leadership. A clear majority (56%) of the British public disagree with the statement that Jeremy Corbyn would make a better job of Brexit than Theresa May, with almost half of the population (45%) disagreeing strongly. And, given the deadlock over the Brexit deal, support for a general election is lower than for a second referendum (29% vs 36%). Indeed, marginally more 2017 Labour voters agree that a second referendum is a good idea (50%) compared to a general election (47%).

     

    This poll was featured in The Guardian – read the article here.

     

    We also asked Voting Intention, with the results as below – Labour are up to 40%, one percentage point ahead of the Conservatives on 39%.

     

    Conservative

    39%

    Labour

    40%

    LibDem

    9%

    SNP

    3%

    PC

    *%

    Green

    3%

    UKIP

    5%

    Other

    1%

     

    ICM Unlimited interviewed a representative online sample of 2,046 adults aged 18+, between 16th – 18th January 2019. Interviews were conducted across the country and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults. ICM is a member of the British Polling Council and abides by its rules.

     

  • Family Action – Family Monsters

    ICM were commissioned to carry out a poll on family pressures on behalf of Family Action.

    ICM Unlimited interviewed two representative samples of 2,050 (wave 1) and 2,044 (wave 2) people aged 18+ living in Great Britain online between 11th – 13th May (wave 1) and 25th – 27th July 2018 (wave 2). Interviews were conducted online, and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults.

    This research was covered on www.thedrum.com and other media outlets.

     

    Key findings from the study include:

    3 in 4 (75%) families say that there is at least one common pressure for them and their close family. A lack of money, followed by cost of living, is the top ‘main pressure’ cited, with physical health issues/disability following this. Other top pressures relate to health and wellness overall, including mental health and care of ageing relatives, spending quality time together, family relationships and work/education pressures.

    The preferred option to address family pressures is to talk about it with someone. However, 4 in 10 (42% of those who have close family pressures) don’t do anything about it. Some feel like they don’t need to (19%), but there are barriers in place for others including:

    • Not being sure who can help (14%)
    • Thinking they should be able to overcome them as a family without external support (13%)
    • Their family living far away (13%)
    • Thinking other people need support than them (12%)
    • A lack of confidence (11%)
    • Fear of being judged (9%)
    • Not being ready to talk about it (7%)
    • A lack of services near them (6%)
    • Not thinking their family pressures will be taken seriously (6%)

    Download tables here

  • Debt Hacker Poll

    ICM were commissioned to carry out a poll on attitudes to debt and payday lending on behalf of Debt Hacker.

    ICM Unlimited interviewed a representative sample of 2,002 adults across Great Britain aged 18+, between 3rd – 8th October 2018. Interviews were conducted online and the results have been weighted to the profile of all adults.

    This research was covered in The Big Issue and other media outlets.

    Download tables here